Instruction - Stop the Slice

Instruction

Stop the Slice

Work on a more consistent, shallow swing plane to cure the dreaded slice

By Tim Cusick The golf season is upon us in the Metroplex, and if I could do one thing for the golfers in our area this year, it would be to help them stop slicing the ball. The slice is the biggest mistake the majority of golfers make off the tee, and it’s a mistake that is most exaggerated with the driver.

Instruction 1 

First, you must understand why the ball slices. When the club enters impact open to the swing path (pointing right for right-handed golfers), the ball will slice. The greater the degree the clubface is open to the swing path, the more the ball slices.

There are four reasons why the clubface may be open at impact:

  1. The grip is too weak.
  2. The swing plane is too upright.
  3. The body has turned through impact faster than the club.
  4. The inability to rotate the clubface back to square at impact.

 

Instruction 2

 

The grip is the easiest fix and usually only a piece of the puzzle in fixing a slice. For a slicer, to ensure your grip is correct, you should see 2-2½ knuckles on your top hand at address, and half of your top hand thumb should be visible once you place your bottom hand on the club.

The majority of slices occur when the club swings on a plane that is too upright. When this occurs, as the club approaches impact the arms and hands can’t rotate and therefore create a blocking motion, leaving the clubface open. As this mistake continues to occur, golfers will do one of three things (or a combination) to minimize the slice:

  1. Swing in the opposite direction the ball is curving, which is to the left for a right-handed golfer.
  2. Attempt to use their upper body in the downswing to close the clubface.
  3. Strengthen their grip.

 

Instruction 3

 

Unfortunately, these compensations are fleeting. The correction should be to get the club to swing more on a consistent plane to allow the clubface an opportunity to release at impact.

For a swing that’s too upright, practice making baseball swings by holding the clubhead at knee level. As you approach impact, actively feel your left forearm and hand rotate to allow the club to release at impact. In conjunction with this motion, turn your shoulders in the backswing and then keep your back to the target in the downswing, allowing your arms to swing more freely and give them time to release the club. When making this correction, if the ball starts pulling or pull-hooking, focus on angling your swing more from inside the target line and out to right field. This will minimize the slice path you created.

By minimizing or eliminating your slice, you will hit the ball more solid, straighter and farther. This is the triple threat you’re looking for to improve your game in 2014.

 

The slice is the biggest mistake the majority of golfers make off the tee, and it’s a mistake that is most exaggerated with the driver.

 

SCORECARD

  • When the club enters impact open to the swing path (pointing right for right-handed golfers), the ball will slice. The greater the degree the clubface is open to the swing path, the more the ball slices.
  • The grip is the easiest fix and usually only a piece of the puzzle in fixing a slice.
  • The majority of slices occur when the club swings on a plane that is too upright.
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